Moving In

Checklists for landlords and tenants beginning a tenancy.

Visual of a construction site

Moving in checklist for tenants

Photographs

It is a good idea to take photographs of the property before the commencement of a new tenancy, and if possible date them.  Similarly, photos should be taken before moving out of the dwelling. This is important should a dispute arise regarding the condition of the property when the tenancy ends  

Who is the landlord?

It is important to know the name of the landlord.  If dealing with an agent, a tenant is entitled to the full name and contact details of the landlord(s) under the Housing Rent Book Regulations Act 1993.  Even if dealing with an agent or landlord representative throughout a tenancy, in the event of a dispute, the tenant can only refer an application for dispute resolution against the landlord. Check the RTB database of dispute resolution outcomes here.

Leaving early?

In general in the first six months of a tenancy the landlord or tenant can terminate without a reason but this cannot be done in a fixed term tenancy. Tenants cannot terminate a fixed term lease unless the landlord has not agreed to assign or sublet the tenancy.

Rights and responsibilities

Tenants and landlords should be familiar with their rights and responsibilities. Click here for more information on rights and responsibilities.

Contact details

The landlord should provide the tenant with their contact details or the contact details of any agent working on their behalf.

Check RTB database of dispute outcomes

We recommend that tenants and landlords search the RTB database for all dispute outcomes before renting a property.

Moving in checklist for landlords 

Photographs

It is a good idea to take photographs of the property before the commencement of a new tenancy, and if possible to date them.  Similarly, photos should be taken of the property before the tenant moves out. This is important should an issue arise regarding the condition of the property when the tenancy ends.  

PPS number

It is really important to obtain a tenant’s PPS number before a tenancy commences.  A PPS number is a unique identifier, and in the event of a dispute, the RTB will have an improved chance of tracing a tenant(s) address if a PPS number is supplied. Without a PPS number, the RTB may not be able to locate the tenant and may not be in a position to process your dispute.  

Checks

  • Landlords should search the RTB website for all dispute outcomes involving tenants before renting out their property
  • Landlords should be familiar with their rights and responsibilities as well as those of their tenant(s). 
  • Landlords should provide the tenant(s) with their contact details or those of the agent.
  • Landlords should get the tenant(s) contact details.
  • Check out Revenue.ie to get further information on taxation implications on rental income and deductions.  

Rent Pressure Zones

A Rent Pressure Zone (RPZ) is a designated area where rents cannot be increased by more than general inflation, as recorded by the Harmonised Index of the Consumer Price (HICP). This applies to new and existing tenancies (unless an exemption is being applied). Previously, in RPZs rent levels could not be increased by more than 4% annually. Since 16th July 2021, this has been replaced which means that rent levels can only be increased in line with the HICP. More information on HICP can be found here

In the case of a new tenancy in a rent pressure zone, a landlord is required to furnish the tenant, in writing, with the following information at the commencement of the tenancy: 

  • The amount of rent that was last set, which is the rent amount the previous tenant was paying in the rental dwelling.  
  • The date the rent was last set, which is the date that the tenancy commenced or the date the landlord previously set and served the notice of rent review.   
  • A statement as to how the rent was set in the rental dwelling having regard to the RTB Rent Pressure Zone calculator which reflects the latest HICP.  

See here for more information on setting rent in Rent Pressure Zones. 

(i)  The amount of rent that was last set under a tenancy for the dwelling;
(ii)  The date the rent was last set under a tenancy for the dwelling;
(iii) A statement as to how the rent set under the tenancy of the dwelling has been calculated having regard to the rent pressure zone formula.

See here for more information on setting rent in Rent Pressure Zones.

How is an area designated a Rent Pressure Zone?

For an area to be designated a Rent Pressure Zone, the following criteria are used: 

  • The standardised average rent in the area must be above the standardised average rent in the comparison area in the quarter; and, 
  • The annual rate of rent inflation in the area must have been 7% or more in four of the last six quarters. 

The three different comparison areas so be used when assessing an area: 

  1. Dublin areas is compared to the national standardised average rent. 
  2. The 'Greater Dublin Area' (Kildare, Meath, Wicklow) - excluding Dublin - is compared to the national standardised average rent excluding Dublin (Non-Dublin). 
  3. The rest of the country - areas outside the 'Greater Dublin Area' and Dublin - are compared to an outside GDA standardised average rent.  
  4. Landlords should note that if their tenancy was already in existence when the area was designated, they remain under the current rent certainty measures (rent review once every 24 months) for the purpose of the next rent review. Every review thereafter will be permitted annually. 

Landlords should note that if their tenancy was already in existence when the area was designated, they remain under the current rent certainty measures (rent review once every 24 months) for the purpose of the next rent review. Every review thereafter will be permitted annually. 

The data from the RTB Rent Index, which is produced on a quarterly basis, underpins the analysis of areas for RPZ designation. 

Exemptions to the Rent Pressure Zone rental cap

It is important to remember that not all properties in Rent Pressure Zone areas are subject to the HICP rent restrictions. Exempt properties include properties that have not been rented for a period of two years prior to the immediate tenancy commencement date, and those that have undergone a 'substantial change in the nature of the accommodation'. 

There have been changes to the legislation effective from 4th June 2019 relating to the exemption rules and criteria as set out below. The following exemptions may be applied by landlords: 

Exemption 1: The initial setting of the rent on a dwelling which had not been rented for a period of two years prior to the immediate tenancy commencement date. All rent reviews thereafter must adhere to the Rent Pressure Zone formula.  

Exemption 2: The dwelling which is, or is in, a protected or proposed protected structure that has not been rented for a period of 12 months prior to the immediate tenancy commencement date.   

Exemption 3: A 'substantial change' in the nature of the accommodation has been defined in the legislation and will only be deemed to have taken place where the below criteria is met: 

“the works carried out to the dwelling concerned -  

(i) consist of a permanent extension to the dwelling that increases the floor area (within the meaning of Article 6 of the Building Regulations 1997 (S.I. No. 497 of 1997)) of the dwelling by an amount equal to not less than 25% of the floor area (within such meaning) of the dwelling as it stood immediately before the commencement of those works,  

or 

(ii) in the case of a dwelling to which the European Union (Energy Performance of Buildings) Regulations 2012 (S.I. No. 243 of 2012) apply, result in the BER (within the meaning of those Regulations) being improved by not less than 7 building energy ratings,  

or any 3 or more of the following: 

the internal layout of the dwelling being permanently altered; 

the dwelling being adapted to provide for access and use by a person with a disability, within the meaning of the Disability Act 2005; 

a permanent increase in the number of rooms in a dwelling;  

in the case of a dwelling to which the European Union (Energy Performance of Buildings) Regulations 2012 (S.I. No. 243 of 2012) apply and that has a BER of D1 or lower, the BER (within the meaning of those Regulations) being improved by not less than 3 building energy ratings; or 

in the case of a dwelling to which the European Union (Energy Performance of Buildings) Regulations 2012 (S.I. No. 243 of 2012) apply and that has a BER of C3 of higher, the BER (within the meaning of those Regulations) being improved by not less than 2 building energy ratings.